Sleep Apnea Education Videos

Obstructive Sleep Apnea versus Central Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea is when the airwaybecomes narrowed or obstructed and you're making the effort to breathe but we do notsee any flow in air movement coming from your nose or mouth. Where central sleep apnea occurswhere your brain forgets to tell your body to breathe. If we're looking at it from avery simplistic term and so we do not see the drive to breathe. So the first step isto come into the and be seen by one of our physicians in the sleep medicine .We'll go through a questionnaire and try to determine what risk factors we think you havefor sleep apnea such as obesity, snoring, daytime sleepiness and then if we think thatyou have a high risk for meeting those criteria

then we would set you up for a sleep studyeither in your home to do an overnight sleep study or in our laboratory, depending on yoursituation. The CPAP can be used to treat both conditions and, in some patients, that isenough. However, there are some patients that have more complex types of central sleep apneathat require more complicated types of machines to treat that condition. Obstructive sleepapnea actually has been linked to a lot of other problems such as high blood pressureand then, you know, difficulty functioning during the day. If it goes untreated for along period of time there's an increased risk of early heart problems and those types ofthings.

What would happen if you didnt sleep Claudia Aguirre

In 1965, 17yearold high school student,Randy Gardner stayed award for 264 hours. That's 11 days to see howhe'd cope without sleep. On the second day, his eyes stopped focusing. Next, he lost the abilityto identify objects by touch. By day three, Gardner was moodyand uncoordinated. At the end of the experiment,he was struggling to concentrate, had trouble with shortterm memory,

became paranoid, and started hallucinating. Although Gardner recovered withoutlongterm psychological or physical damage, for others, losing shuteye can resultin hormonal imbalance, illness, and, in extreme cases, death. We're only beginning to understandwhy we sleep to begin with,

but we do know it's essential. Adults need seven to eight hoursof sleep a night, and adolescents need about ten. We grow sleepy due to signalsfrom our body telling our brain we are tired, and signals from the environmenttelling us it's dark outside. The rise in sleepinducing chemicals, like adenosine and melatonin,

send us into a light doze that grows deeper, making our breathing and heart rate slow down and our muscles relax. This nonREM sleep is when DNA is repaired and our bodies replenish themselvesfor the day ahead. In the United States, it's estimated that 30% of adultsand 66% of adolescents are regularly sleepdeprived.

This isn't just a minor inconvenience. Staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. When we lose sleep, learning, memory, mood, and reaction time are affected. Sleeplessness may also cause inflammation,

halluciations, high blood pressure, and it's even been linkedto diabetes and obesity. In 2014, a devoted soccer fan died after staying awake for 48 hours to watch the World Cup. While his untimely death was due to a stroke, studies show that chronically sleepingfewer than six hours a night increases stroke risk by four and half times

Sleep disorders Processing the Environment MCAT Khan Academy

Voiceover: I'm sure we'veall had trouble sleeping at one point or another, maybe trouble falling asleep,staying asleep or waking up or maybe you're forcingyourself to sleep less because you have toomuch to do to lie in bed. But sleep deprivationcan be a serious issue. People who don't get enoughsleep are more irritable and perform worse onmemory and detention tasks

than people who do. So all this can be just a minorannoyance in everyday life, imagine the longtermimplications for let's say, airline pilots, firefighters,security officers or the person driving nextto you on the freeway. For example, one studyin Canada showed that the Monday after the Spring time change, so when people lose an hour of sleep,

the number of trafficaccidents increases sharply compared to the Mondayafter the Fall time change when people get an extra hour of sleep, the number of accidents decreases sharply. So that's just one example,but sleep deprivation also makes people more susceptible to obesity. When you're sleep deprived you'rebody produces more cortisol which is a hormone that tellsyour body to make more fat.

You also produce more of thehormone that tells your body you're hungry, so you end upeating more and turning more of what you eat into fat whichcan contribute to weight gain. And finally sleep deprivationcan also increase your risk for depression and one theoryabout this link is that REM sleep helps your brainprocess emotional experiences, which in turn helpsprotect against depression though we're still notentirely sure about this link.

Most people, now most peopleexperience sleep deprivation at some points in their lives, but the good news isthat most people can get back on track by getting afew nights of good sleep, sort of paying back your sleep debt. Your next question might be then, quot;How much sleep is enough sleepéquot; That's kind of a hard question to answer,

but most adults needabout 78 hours of sleep, but the exact number variesby individual and by age. Babies need a lot more sleep,for example, than older adults often sleep less than 10 or 8hours without severe detriments. Again everyone has troublefalling asleep at some point, but people who have persistentproblems in falling or staying asleep have a more seroussleep disorder called insomnia. There are various medicationsthat can help people

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