Sleep Apnea Articles

Living With and Managing Sleep Apnea

JIM: I had this problem throughout my life. Driving was always a problem, and I tried to make sure that no place I ever had to go was very far away because I knew I'd fall asleep. Carol Lynn was complaining about snoring and, more specifically, snoring and then long periods of nothing,

and then a gasp when I would, you know, start breathing again. Obviously, I wanted to enjoy my life with my children more than I felt that I was enjoying it. It's Saturday morning, and the kids are at your bed ready to do something, and I'm just like, quot;I gotta sleep, guys. I'm sorry. I can't play with you. I can't do this.quot; And I look back and I'm like, quot;This just can't be right.quot;

I had been talking to my about possibly having depression symptoms. I remember the other thing that I said to the when I went was that I no longer had any dreams. If you're not getting into REM sleep, you have no dreams. And so she's the one who then said, quot;Okay, we're gonna send you for a sleep study.quot; I spent the night there.

The amount of times that I was technically waking, and as low as my blood oxygen levels were, it was extreme. I was diagnosed with severe obstructive sleep apnea. Surgery, as it turned out, really wasn't a good option for me. The next step was that my did prescribe a CPAP machine. CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure.

The idea is they have to get the air pressure to your nose or your mouth or both in order to keep your airway open while you sleep. Because it wasn't comfortable for me to use, I was not using it as well as I should have been, in some cases not at all for weeks at a time. And things got worse, other symptoms appeared. I felt confused and out of it and just not right.

And I realized that I really needed to figure out a way to learn to live with this contraption. Now I'm at the point where I am consistently using it and have been for a long period of time. I definitely feel better. I'm looking forward to feeling better yet. Certainly, I have more energy to do activities with the children than I did before, and we do more.

Trouble in Bed When Sleep Turns Against Us

Say you've been napping, like between classes, or after a long night out, or, I don't know, after broadcasting on YouTube for 48 straight hours to raise money for charity. Now, imagine you waking up, and suddenly you discover that you can't move. You want to speak, but you can't; you're mind is acutely aware of what's happening, but you are powerless to get your body to do anything. It may last a few seconds, it may last a few minutes, in rare cases it can last more than an hour it's called Sleep Paralysis and you might not have to imagine it

because up to 40% of us have experienced this sleep disorder at some point in our lives. I am one of them. We don't like to think about the bad things that can go on while we're in dreamland just as we hate the disorders that keep us from even falling asleep Hello, Insomnia. But even though we've talked a lot on this show about the science of sleep Why we need it Why we dream

and where dreams come from. There is a whole other polymorphously messed up realm of human biology that explains what happens when sleeps turns against us. We can't turn our brains off. We forget to breathe. We have waking hallucinations. Some of us even walk, eat, run, and have entire conversations when we're asleep. The halfasleep brain is a crazy place

and once you understand it, you may never see the back of your eyelids the same way again. (intro music) When most people think of the things that cramp our sleep style they think, Insomnia. But defining, diagnosing, and treating this most common sleep disorder can be tricky. In fact, for a long time, most scientists considered insomnia to be a symptom of another problem like depression, anxiety, asthma, stress, substance abuse, a traumatic injury even jetlag Though, today, insomnia is considered by many to be a chronic disease of its own

that interacts with other medical conditions So, if you've ever had prolonged trouble falling asleep, or staying asleep but you don't have any other health issues then s would probably say that you have Primary Insomnia. If you do have something else going on, like a physical or psychological condition then you've got Secondary Insomnia. And most cases of Secondary Insomnia are chronic meaning it lasts for more than a month.

There are also cases of Acute or shortterm Insomnia which is usually triggered by stress or some specific life event Whatever the cause scientists believe these Insomnias are the result of the simple but eternal struggle between arousal and sleepiness. More and more research is suggesting that a condition known as HyperArousal where the nervous system remains in a constant state of alert may be the main reason for chronic insomnia.

Sleep deprivation disparities in health economic and social wellbeing Lauren Hale at TEDxSBU

Good morning! OK. Raise your hand if you did not get enough sleep last night. There are many possible reasons for this. Maybe you were up late at night because you had a toddler screaming for you in the middle of the night. I know I did! Or maybe you were cranking away

on that final document for work or for school. Or maybe you just got sucked in to watching another episode of the Daily Show. OK. So now, raise your hand if you are regularly not functioning at your top game because of how you slept. OK. So as sleep deprived as we are, we are among the lucky ones.

I say that because to be here today you need to be affiliated with Stony Brook University. That tells me that you've had the opportunity to pursue higher education. Further, to be here you have to have the ability to make choices about how you spend your time, control over your life.

Imagine how much harder it would be for you to sleep and to function, if you didn't have that control over your own time. I know it's hard to put yourself in someone else's shoes, but imagine, for example, if you didn't have enough money to feed your children. How hard would it be for you to sleepé Or imagine if your crowded urban apartment

was too noisy, or too cold, or too unsafe for you to comfortably fall asleep at night. My goal today is to get you thinking about the social patterning of sleep, why some of us are sleeping worse than others and what the consequences are for society. In my research, I investigate the underlying causes and consequences of sleep deprivation

and sleep disorders. Today I'll share with you some of the results of my research and that of my colleagues. And I hope to convey to you why we, as individuals and as a society, should be deeply concerned about how we sleep and what we can do about it. So, for everybody, whether you're rich or poor,

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