Sleep Apnea And Add

Snoring Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Treatment Animation

Snoring and sleep apnea.In normal breathing, air enters the nostrils and goes through the throat and the tracheato the lungs. In people who snore this airway is partiallyobstructed by excess tissue of the throat, such as large tonsils, large soft palate ortongue. Another common cause of obstruction is the dropping of the tongue into the throatdue to over relaxation of tongue muscles during sleep. Air currents competing throughnarrow spaces in the throat cause the soft palate essentially a piece of soft tissuehanging in the throat to vibrate. This vibration is the source of the noise we hear when someoneis snoring.

Sleep apnea happens when the airway is completelyobstructed, no air can go through and the person stops breathing. This cessation ofbreathing triggers the brain to respond by waking up the person just enough to take abreath. This repeats itself again and again during the course of the night and may resultin sleep deprivation. Snoring and mild sleep apnea may be treatedwith a mandibular advancement device. This device is designed to move the lower jaw andthe tongue slightly forward and thus making the space in the back of the throat larger.

Compensation 101 How did I get this rating

If you've receiveda rating with multiple disabilitiesand wondered how VA got the combined percentage,the following information and example can help youunderstand. VA uses a concept calledthe quot;Whole Person Theoryquot; to determine Veteran'scombined disability rating. This method ensures thata disability rating can never be greater than 100,since a person cannot be

more than 100% able bodied. The disability isdetermined by using the quot;Combined Rating Tablequot;located at 38 CFR 4.25. To use the rating table,you need to start with the highest disabilitypercentage, and from there, arrange them in orderof severity, highest to lowest. For example, if there aretwo disabilities evaluated 50 and 30 percent disabling,the highest degree

or most severe disability in this example 50% will be foundin the left column. Then, the otherless severe disability in this example 30% will be found in the top row. The figures appearingin the space where the left columnand top row intersect will represent the combinedvalue of both disabilities. This combined value willthen be converted

to the nearest numberdivisible by 10. Remember, combined valuesending in 5 or higher, will be adjusted upward to the nearest number divisible by 10. Combined values endingin 4 or lower, will be rounded down to the nearest divisible by 10. The rounding is only doneat the very end after all the disabilitieshave been combined. Let's begin withJoe Veteran as an example.

Joe has been ratedfor the following disabilities in order of severity: 30% PostTraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), 20% Diabetes Mellitus,10% Peripheral Neuropathy. Joe has a combined rating of 50%. This combined rating wasderived by the following method. Start with the greatestdisability and then combine them using Table 1in 38 CFR 4.25.

First take the 30% ratingand find it in the left column. Then take the nexthighest disability which is 20% from the top row. The figures appearingin the space where the column and row intersect will represent the combined value of the two. The value is 44. Use this value for theleft row and then find

Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome

The difference between Obstructive Sleep Apneaand Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome is defined by how you define apneas and hypopneas. Apneasmean you stop breathing for 10 seconds or longer that's complete obstruction. Hypopneasmeans it's 10 seconds or longer pauses but you have partial obstruction. So you needa combination of five to 15 apneas andor hypopneas per hour to say you have sleep apnea.Now, let's say that you stop breathing 25 times an hour, but you wake up between oneand nine seconds for each episode, then you're told you don't have any sleep apnea. So thisis called Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome, meaning that you have lesser degrees of apneasor hypopneas that don't get counted as formal

Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

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