Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Causes

Living With and Managing Sleep Apnea

JIM: I had this problem throughout my life. Driving was always a problem, and I tried to make sure that no place I ever had to go was very far away because I knew I'd fall asleep. Carol Lynn was complaining about snoring and, more specifically, snoring and then long periods of nothing,

and then a gasp when I would, you know, start breathing again. Obviously, I wanted to enjoy my life with my children more than I felt that I was enjoying it. It's Saturday morning, and the kids are at your bed ready to do something, and I'm just like, quot;I gotta sleep, guys. I'm sorry. I can't play with you. I can't do this.quot; And I look back and I'm like, quot;This just can't be right.quot;

I had been talking to my about possibly having depression symptoms. I remember the other thing that I said to the when I went was that I no longer had any dreams. If you're not getting into REM sleep, you have no dreams. And so she's the one who then said, quot;Okay, we're gonna send you for a sleep study.quot; I spent the night there.

The amount of times that I was technically waking, and as low as my blood oxygen levels were, it was extreme. I was diagnosed with severe obstructive sleep apnea. Surgery, as it turned out, really wasn't a good option for me. The next step was that my did prescribe a CPAP machine. CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure.

The idea is they have to get the air pressure to your nose or your mouth or both in order to keep your airway open while you sleep. Because it wasn't comfortable for me to use, I was not using it as well as I should have been, in some cases not at all for weeks at a time. And things got worse, other symptoms appeared. I felt confused and out of it and just not right.

And I realized that I really needed to figure out a way to learn to live with this contraption. Now I'm at the point where I am consistently using it and have been for a long period of time. I definitely feel better. I'm looking forward to feeling better yet. Certainly, I have more energy to do activities with the children than I did before, and we do more.

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy for OSA Anesthetic Considerations by Denise Chan MD

Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy for ObstructiveSleep Apnea: Anesthetic Considerations, by Denise Chan. Hello, my name is Denise Chan, and I'm a pediatricanesthesiologist at Boston Children's . Today, I'll be discussing important aspectsof taking care of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the perioperativesetting. Introduction. Now, first let's define what is obstructivesleep apnea syndrome. Well, it's a disorder of breathing during sleep, and it's characterizedby a few different things, according to the

American Thoracic Society. First of all, these patients have either prolongedupper airway obstruction, which is known as obstructive hypopnea, or intermittent completeobstruction, known as obstructive sleep apnea. And this occurs with or without snoring. Second, the patient exhibits moderate to severeoxygen desaturation. Third, normal ventilation is disrupted. And fourth, normal sleep patternsare disrupted. So these are the components of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Now, in children, obstructive sleep apneasyndrome is oftentimes caused by enlarged

adenoid or tonsillar tissue. And you can seein this illustration that the hypertrophied tonsils really do get in the way of normalairflow. So what do you expect to see in a patientwith this syndromeé First of all, you'll probably see snoring. They'll have difficulty breathingduring sleep, restless sleep, or even nightmares or night terrors. You may see excessive sweating.They may have nocturnal enuresis, or bedwetting, mouth breathing, pauses in breathing, or chronicrhinorrhea. More importantly, though, what is the significanceof having obstructive sleep apnea, and what are the consequences for the patienté Well,there are a number of problems that can occur.

Daytime somnolence patients have fallenasleep while driving older patients, of course and this can lead to motor vehicleaccidents; cognitive dysfunction, which leads to behavioral problems or problems with workor school performance; metabolic effects, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetesmellitus, or metabolic syndrome; or other metabolic effects, such as failure to thriveor stunted growth. Or if obstructive sleep apnea is more severeor left untreated, this could lead to cardiovascular morbidity, such as pulmonary or systemic hypertension,cor pulmonale, or stroke. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome can even lead to death. Andit's been hypothesized to be a factor contributing

to SIDS, or Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.Diagnosis and al Features. In order to diagnose whether or not someonehas obstructive sleep apnea, you must first and foremost perform a thorough history andphysical exam. A sleep history screening for snoring should be a part of every child'sroutine health care visits. It's really unlikely that someone's goingto have obstructive sleep apnea if they don't snore. So if a child does snore, ask the parentsmore details about the sleep history. Does your child have difficulty breathing or stopbreathing during sleepé Or are you worried about their breathing at nighté Does yourchild sweat during sleepé Does your child

have restless sleepé Does he or she breathethrough his mouth while awakeé Has anyone in the family had obstructive sleep apneaor sudden infant death syndromeé Or does your child have behavioral problemsé When you examine the patient, you may noticecertain features that are suggestive of obstructive sleep apnea, such as a small, triangular chin,retrognathia, a high arched palate or a long soft palate, a long oval face, or, of course,large tonsils. There are also certain patients who are athigh risk for having obstructive sleep apnea. And these are patients with obesity; Downsyndrome; PraderWilli syndrome; certain neuromuscular

Does Obstructive Sleep Apnea Cause Cancer Thousand Oaks Malibu Westlake Village Popper

There is no scientific evidencethat sleep apnea causes cancer. A recent article showing an “association� of sleep apnea with a higher mortality from cancer has recently raised controversy. However, when one sifts through all of the data, both supporting and conflicting, there is no clear association of sleep apnea and cancer risk.

What is known is that low levelsof oxygen associated with sleep apnea, especially severe sleep apnea, has been shown to cause anincrease in growth of blood vessels. Low oxygen levels from other causes have also been shown to do this. Therefore, it is thought that severe sleepapnea or severely depressed oxygen levels in association with other cancer risk factors “may� increase the risk of developing cancers.

Hello, I'm Ronald Popper. Thank you for watching. If you or a loved one needs moreinformation on sleep disorders, please visit our web site at sleepmd4u where you'll find more tutorials in this series as well as our white paper on obstructive sleep apnea that is free for you to download. For a direct consultation youcan reach us through our web site

or by calling the number on your screen. Always remember, sleep well tonight for a better day tomorrow.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (5 votes, average: 6.00 out of 5)
Loading...

Leave a Reply