Sleep Apnea And Bad Dreams

How to Treat Sleep Apnea Naturally

Hi, my name is Troy Giles. I am a of Chiropractic and a Natural Internist. Today I wanted to talk to you a little about apnea,and sleep apnea. This is a major issue in the world. People are having trouble sleepingand there are many reasons for apnea. One is neurologic, where the nerves, the brain,the connection to the lung is not working correctly. Also, thyroid we find, thyroiddysfunction, where low thyroid. Thyroid is what helps you control your breathing patternswhile you are asleep. If you have low thyroid, the thyroid affects the heart and the rhythmof breathing. So low thyroid can affect it as well. But, apnea is when you can't breathwell. Your sleeping and you just stop breathing.

There can be constrictive apnea as well, whereyou have enlarged tonsils, or your throat is closed down. I had a patient that had,this has been probably ten years ago, had a roto rooter, if you will, where they went in down on thetrachea, the throat, removed the tonsils and literally removed and widened the trachea,all the way down through his neck, through his throat. Extremely painful, literally hewished he could have died. That ultimately, still didn't help any. He can get better air,bit still he is on a CPAP machine. The treatment for it, medically, is to use a CPAP or a ByPAPmachine, which helps to force air into you and helps you to breathe during the evening.Another issue is that many times its body

habitus, enlarged gut. If you are laying onyour side and you have a larger tummy, you have to push your tummy up while you are breathing,sleeping at nighttime. Literally, you are having to lift up your tummy all night long.After a couple of hours or so, you become fatigued. The diaphragm becomes fatigued oflifting, pushing. So you just stop breathing for a minute. You can go 30 seconds, a minute,2 minutes. Finally, you gasp for air. This happens over and over and over. The CPAP helpsto force the air in you are just basically breathing easier. The sense of breathing isthere, but you are now lifting with forced air, in the abdomen, and in to your lungs.So to treat this, naturally, we want to look

at supporting the lung tissue. We want tosupport anything that is going to help you to get rid of inflammation through the throat.We want to treat the thyroid and the adrenal glands to have them up and running the waythey should so they are giving good information to the heart and to your breathing pattern.We would do this through supplementation. The supplementation we would want to looktowards would be the adrenal glands first, Adrenex. We would support the adrenals withAdrenex. Thyroiden to support the thyroid tissue. Thyroid again, we want to get itsmetabolism and its function the way that it should. Permalung helps to bring clarity,helps to remove sluggishness of the lungs,

bronchial congestion, mucus. A lot of timesthere is a mucus build up throughout the lung. Even with that we would want to look towardsleaky gut syndrome because when you have leaky gut, you are actually leaking toxins throughthe gut and they overwhelm the liver and its ability to detoxify. So a lot of the overalltoxins will come up and out through the lung. So you will have a lot of increased amountof toxin and production of mucus, so you will tighten up as well. So, asthma and apnea alsowork together. So, you want to see if you can't get rid of some of that tightness andcongestion that you feel. I would work with the diet, just helping, just eating more greenleafy vegetables. It is so vital to eat green

leafy vegetables every meal. So how do eatgreen leafy vegetables for breakfasté I would encourage you to get a significant blender,Vitamix is a good one, Blendtec is another one, Montel Williams I think has one thatis a good like two horsepower motor, that you can put in all the kinds of fruits thatyou want, green leafy vegetables, like kale, baby spinach, literally any vegetable thatyou want can go in there as well. If you make it correctly, it tastes very good. You haveall your fruits. You can get some of the big box stores have frozen fruit. You can putthat with a banana, maybe a protein powder of some type. The one we carry here is calledLepterra. That helps make it smoother and

How to Ease Childrens Nightmares

How to Ease Children's NightmaresSteps. Step1. Ensure they get enough sleep. Step2. Make bedtime routines a pleasant experience. Step3.Comfort and reassure the child. Step4. Discuss the nightmare. Step5. Work to overcome nightmares. Please don't forget to subscribe to our channel .

To Sleep Perchance to Dream Crash Course Psychology 9

Comedian Mike Birbiglia was having troublewith sleep. Though not with the actual sleeping part onenight, while staying in a hotel, he dreamed that a guided missile was on its way to hisbed, and in his dream, he jumped out the window to escape it. Unfortunately, he also did this not in hisdream. From the second floor. And the window wasnot open. This little episode cost him 33 stitches anda trip to a sleep specialist. Mike now sleeps in zippedup mummy bags forhis own safety.

The lesson hereé Sleep is not some break timewhen your brain, or your body, just goes dormant. Far from it. In truth, sleep is just anotherstate of consciousness. And only in the past few decades have we begun to really plumbits depths from why we sleep in the first place, to what goes on in our brains whenwe do, to what happens when we can't sleep. And there is a lot that science has to sayabout your dreams! Talk about weird! It's like Sigmund Freudmeets Neil Gaiman. So, even though it may seem like you'redead to the world, when you sleep, your perceptual window remains slightly open.

And kinda like Mike Birbiglia's hotel roomwindow, a trip through it can make for a pretty wild ride. But for your safety and enjoyment, I'm hereto guide you through this state of consciousness, where you'll learn more than a few thingsabout human mind, including your own. And here's hoping you won't need any stitcheswhen we're through. INTRO Technically speaking, sleep is a periodic,natural, reversible and near total loss of consciousness, meaning it's different thanhibernation, being in a coma, or in say, an

anesthetic oblivion. Although we spend about a third of our livessleeping, and we know that it's essential to our health and survival, there still isn'ta scientific consensus for why we do it. Part of it probably has to do with simplerecuperation, allowing our neurons and other cells to rest and repair themselves. Sleepalso supports growth, because that's when our pituitary glands release growth hormones,which is why babies sleep all the time. Plus, sleep has all kinds of benefits for mentalfunction, like improving memory, giving our brains time to process the events of the day,and boosting our creativity.

But even if we're not quite sure of allthe reasons why we sleep, technology has given us great insight into how we sleep. And for that we can thank little Armond Aserinsky.One night in early 1950s Chicago, eightyearold Armond was tucked into his bed by his father.But this night, instead of getting a kiss on the forehead, little Armond got some electrodestaped to his face. Armond's dad was Eugene Aserinsky, a gradstudent looking to test out a new electroencephalograph, or EEG machine, that measures the brain'selectrical activity. That night, as his son slept peacefully, hewatched the machine go bonkers with brain

wave patterns, and after making sure thathis machine wasn't somehow broken discovered that the brain doesn't just quot;power downquot;during sleep, as most scientists thought. Instead, he had discovered the sleep stagewe now call REM or rapid eye movement, a perplexing period when the sleeping brain is buzzingwith activity, even though the body is in a deep slumber. Aserinsky and his colleague Nathaniel Kleitmanwent on to become pioneers of sleep research. Since then, sleep specialists armed with similartechnology have shown that we experience four distinct stages of sleep, each defined byunique brainwave patterns.

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