Relationship Between Sleep Apnea And High Blood Pressure

Snoring Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Treatment Animation

Snoring and sleep apnea.In normal breathing, air enters the nostrils and goes through the throat and the tracheato the lungs. In people who snore this airway is partiallyobstructed by excess tissue of the throat, such as large tonsils, large soft palate ortongue. Another common cause of obstruction is the dropping of the tongue into the throatdue to over relaxation of tongue muscles during sleep. Air currents competing throughnarrow spaces in the throat cause the soft palate essentially a piece of soft tissuehanging in the throat to vibrate. This vibration is the source of the noise we hear when someoneis snoring.

Sleep apnea happens when the airway is completelyobstructed, no air can go through and the person stops breathing. This cessation ofbreathing triggers the brain to respond by waking up the person just enough to take abreath. This repeats itself again and again during the course of the night and may resultin sleep deprivation. Snoring and mild sleep apnea may be treatedwith a mandibular advancement device. This device is designed to move the lower jaw andthe tongue slightly forward and thus making the space in the back of the throat larger.

Sleep Apnea and Hypertension Sleep Apnea Thousand Oaks Malibu Westlake Village Ronald Popper

When a patient stops breathing, the oxygen level drops. In an effort to increase oxygen levels, blood vessels constrict, thereby increasing blood pressure and blood flow and oxygen to the brain and the heart. In addition, when a sudden arousal from sleep occurs, there is a release of adrenaline and other mediators that, over time, will narrow and stiffen blood vessels

thus leading to high blood pressure. Successfully treating obstructivesleep apnea can reverse these changes and result in lowering the blood pressure. If you suffer from high blood pressure and a sleep disorder such as Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome, the two conditions may be related. Hello, I'm Ronald Popper. Thank you for watching.

If you or a loved one needs moreinformation on sleep disorders please visit our web site at sleepmd4u where you'll find more tutorials in this series as well as our white paper on obstructive sleep apnea that is free for you to download. For a direct consultation you canreach us through our web site or by calling the number on your screen. Always remember,

sleep well tonight for a better day tomorrow.

Sleep apnea research The HeartBEAT Study Susan Redline

I'm Susan Redline. I'm from Harvard Medical School and I lead the HeartBEAT study. And HeartBEAT stands for Heart Biomarkers in Apnea Treatment Study. And what this study is is the first ever controlled, randomized study comparing treatment outcomes in patients with sleep apnea. And very specifically we've identified using prior research that sleep apnea and heart disease are highly correlated. And it appears that sleep apnea increases your risk for heart disease. What we didn't know before the study

is whether treatment of sleep apnea might reduce your heart disease risk factors. And furthermore we also didn't know what might be the best treatment. Because of the funding opportunity we were able to for the very first time move our questions out of a typical sleep laboratory, where we know patients have sleep disorders, into cardiology practices, and pilot and refine an approach for screening and diagnosing new cases of sleep apnea and heart disease.

Already we analyzed our crosssectional data and we saw for example that sleep apnics— that the severity of sleep apnea correlated or was associated with how high your blood pressure went up at night during sleep. So one of the things we are going to be looking for is whether treatment with CPAP or with oxygen reduces not only your daytime blood pressure but your average blood pressure over a 24hour period, including that period at night when many heart attacks and strokes occur.

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