Can Sleep Apnea Make You Dizzy

Is surgery the only option for treating sleep apnea or snoring

I do predominantly the line share of sleep apnea surgery in our department. I collaborate closely with the pulmonologists, who are the sleep medicine s. Those are the s that help diagnose and treat sleep apnea, as well. If those patients fail their, their medical or their conservative therapy, that's typically when they get sent to see me for surgical considerations to, to look at potential cures for their apnea. It's not uncommon for me to see a lot of patients for, who come in for snoring complaints and, you know, are wondering whether or not they have sleep apnea. So sleep apnea is condition where you actually stop breathing at night.

Snoring is somewhere on that spectrum, towards the more mild, you know, milder end of that spectrum. But, you know, really the only way to determine if you have sleep apnea, the gold standard of testing, is really getting a sleep study. And that's an overnight, monitored study where patients, you know, sleep in a room that's similar to a hotel room but they're being monitored and they're hooked up, you know, for sound so to speak with different monitors and cables on them. And that's really our best test to diagnose sleep apnea. The treatment for sleep apnea is typically a nonsurgical therapy; something called CPAP,

which stands for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure. And it's the patients that don't tolerate their CPAP who end up seeing me for surgical considerations. And there's a number of reasons why patients may not tolerate their CPAP. But there are some surgeries that can be helpful in patients who are not tolerant of their medical therapy. And I offer a variety of surgeries including nasal surgery, a variety of palatal surgeries for the kind of tonsil and soft pallet region and then also a variety of tonguebased procedures, as well. But we typically see a patient back after their procedure in about three weeks to recheck everything, make sure that they're healing okay.

After that, I normally recheck a sleep study in about three months after their surgery, just to give everything a chance to heal and to scar. And we, you know, make further recommendations based on the result of their followup sleep study after their surgery. We're exploring the, a new technology now which is actually a nerve stimulator for sleep apnea. It's an implantable device, very similar to a pacemaker that goes into the patient's chest. And there's an electrode that will actually stimulate the nerve that goes to the tongue to provide the tongue with a little bit of more tone when they're sleeping at night, and thereby eliminating their sleep apnea.

SECOND OPINION Sleep Apnea BCBS Full Episode

gt;gt;ANNOUNCER: quot;SECOND OPINIONquot; IS BROUGHT TOYOU BY BLUE CROSSBLUE SHIELD, ACCEPTED IN ALL 50 STATES. BLUE CROSSBLUE SHIELD LIVE FEARLESS. gt;gt;ANNOUNCER: quot;SECOND OPINIONquot; IS PRODUCEDIN CONJUNCTION WITH U.R. MEDICINE, PART OF UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTERMEDICAL CENTER, ROCHESTER, NEW YORK. gt;gt;DR. PETER SALGO: THIS IS quot;SECOND OPINION.quot; I'M YOUR HOST, DR.

PETER SALGO. THIS WEEK, MYTH OR MEDICINE quot;EVERY CHILDWHO SNORES NEEDS A TONSILLECTOMY.quot; gt;gt;DR. HEIDI CONNOLLY: PROBABLY ABOUT 8% TO 10% OFPRESCHOOLAGE CHILDREN SNORE. gt;gt;DR. PETER SALGO: AND SPECIAL GUEST CAROL HAGEWALL IS HERE. SHE HAD SOME SCARY SYMPTOMS. THEY DROVE HER TO THE DOCTOR.

AND THEY BROUGHT HER HERE TODAY. gt;gt;CAROL HAGE WALL: I WAS ADVISED BY MY DOCTORTO HAVE A BRAIN SCAN TO BE SURE THAT I DIDN'T HAVE SOME KIND OF A SEIZURE, AND I WENT THROUGHALL OF THOSE THINGS, AND I DIDN'T HAVE ANY OF THOSE THINGS. gt;gt;DR. PETER SALGO: THANKS SO MUCH FOR BEING HERE,CAROL. gt;gt;CAROL HAGE WALL: YOU'RE VERY WELCOME. gt;gt;DR. PETER SALGO: NICE OF YOU TO JOIN US AND SHAREYOUR STORY.

I KNOW YOU'VE GOT A LOT TO TELL US, BUT WHATI'D LIKE TO DO FIRST IS INTRODUCE YOU TO YOUR quot;SECOND OPINIONquot; PANEL. THESE DOCTORS ARE GOING TO BE HERE FOR YOUALL THE WAY THROUGH, AND AT THE END OF THE CASE, YOU'LL HAVE A CHANCE TO ASK THEM ANYQUESTIONS YOU WANT AND GET YOUR OWN SECOND OPINION. FIRST, DR. LISA HARRIS FROM OUR LADY OF LOURDES MEMORIALHOSPITAL. AND DR.

MICHAEL YURCHESHEN FROM THE UNIVERSITY OFROCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER. YOU GUYS BETTER BE READY. I'VE GOT A FEELING SHE'S GOT SOME DOOZIESFOR YOU BY THE END OF TODAY. CAROL, LET'S START YOUR STORY. A FEW YEARS AGO, TAKE US BACK. AS THEY SAY IN THE AVIATION BUSINESS, quot;THEREYOU WERE, MINDING YOUR OWN BUSINESS, WHEN.quot; gt;gt;CAROL HAGE WALL: WHEN I WAS DRIVING MY FORDEXPLORER DOWN THE ROAD AND FOUND MYSELF TURNED OVER IN A DITCH.

SOMEBODY PULLED ME OUT, AND I WAS OKAY, THANKGOODNESS, BUT gt;gt;DR. PETER SALGO: THERE YOU WERE, AND YOU FOUNDYOURSELF IN A CAR, UPSIDE DOWN IN A DITCH! gt;gt;CAROL HAGE WALL: YES. gt;gt;DR. PETER SALGO: YOU HAD NO MEMORY OF ANY OF THATé gt;gt;CAROL HAGE WALL: NO IDEA HOW I GOT THERE. I MEAN, I KNEW THAT I HAD BEEN DRIVING ONTHAT ROAD, AND THERE I WAS, UPSIDE DOWN.

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